“Seventy Years Ago”: A Review of Red Stilts by Ted Kooser

Ordinary and unrefined, Kooser's poems suggest the steady hand of a craftsman who doesn’t need to go looking for the next big thing.

More than a Step on the Boss Man’s Ladder

If Dolly Parton left the Smoky Mountains, it seems to have been on a hero’s journey that Joseph Campbell would have recognized. She came back, bearing gifts.

Introduction to Real Characters

"What we have for neighbors out here is–well–more interesting. We have way more folks who are just themselves and nobody else.”

Jacques Barzun’s 1937 Critique of Race-Thinking

On the heels of a consequential election, and the accompanying commentary demonstrating the continued pervasiveness of race-thinking, Barzun’s message of honoring each human individual’s value while recognizing our shared common humanity is a timely and timeless message.

What is Beauty? A Review of The Father of Lights

The idea that “no arguments or reasons have to be given to enable the experience of beauty” is dearly hopeful in a time when arguments and reasons are largely impotent in reaching people.

It’s a Federalist’s World, After All

Amidst the ongoing chaos and conflict over the 2020 presidential election, and vote tabulating methodologies in particular, let’s remember—and celebrate—that so far it is really only federalism that has won the day.

A Country Boy Can Thrive

You can leave your corner of the country without escaping it. And these memoirs testify to the importance of bringing something back.

We are Bound by Suffering and Love

Many religions understand suffering to be laden with the potential for spiritual awakening through a reduction of worldly attachments. But Christianity has a unique understanding of suffering that offers a particular kind of solace.

A Metaphysics of Place: Reintegrating Nous and Cosmos at the Foot of the Burning...

Even in the midst of this sad era of cold, objective ambition, the possibility of grateful participation in the cosmic life of creation remains for each of us.

Contemporary Christian Fiction: The Example of Joshua Hren

In the Wine Press gathers together a host of rough-edged stories of American Christians living in the rise and fall of both Evangelical Catholic and Protestant American Christianity, which arose in the twilight of the Clinton era and peaked during the confluence of religious fervor and patriotism under the White House of George W. Bush.

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From the Archives

From the Editor–Local Culture 2.2: Christopher Lasch

Over and against manifest follies that characterize American life in the first quarter of the twenty-first century there stands the wide-ranging work, keen and voluminous, of the historian and social critic Christopher Lasch.

Monopoly House Rules

I love board games.  Truth be told, I am a sucker for games of all types, but there are a number of aspects to playing...

Giving Thanks for Russell Kirk’s Long Shadow

And what there is to conquer By strength and submission, has already been discovered Once or twice, or several times, by men whom one cannot hope To...