Home Tags Wendell Berry

Tag: Wendell Berry

Vanishing Little Languages

Andrew Figueiredo describes his family connection to Minderico, a language belonging to the Portuguese town of Minde. Localists must join the fight to save endangered languages, if only because they present us with a way to practice stewardship, rebel against the abstractions of technique and global commerce, and save our world’s cultural heritage.

Lonely in the Center

Hassler and McDonagh conclude their stories with the hope that, in the absence of the clergy, faithful everyday Christians can rebuild the lost soil of local culture through faith and forgiveness.

James Rebanks in Conversation: Pastoral Song

James Rebanks and Grace Olmstead discuss his book, Wendell Berry, his vision for future farming methodologies, and the conversations surrounding agricultural reform in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Epistemology on the Front Porch: Esther Lightcap Meek

Esther Lightcap Meek on Wendell Berry, Michael Polanyi, and covenant epistemology.

Civilization, Escape, or Community: Revisiting Into the Wild with Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry pleads with us to see that true joy and fulfillment— the very motivations at the heart of Huck Finn and Christopher McCandless—are to be found not in escape and isolation, but in willing membership and participation in community life.

The Restorative Tonic of Wildness

Particularly in a culture that values comfort and convenience, we need to listen to those who have encountered wilderness with the humility and attentiveness necessary to receive its instruction.

Larry McMurtry and Wendell Berry at the Dairy Queen

McMurtry couldn’t quite set the Bowie knife to the scalp of the Western like Cormac McCarthy did the same year, maybe because he knew those people weren’t grotesque caricatures; they were people he’d known and loved. And when he died last week, he was probably the last person in Archer City who had any connection to those people at all.

Grace Olmstead on Uprooted, Place, Idaho, and Prairie Lupines

Fidelity to place needn’t (and shouldn’t) result in stuckness, a condemnation of ever moving at all. But we must beware falling into that second trap: rejecting roots altogether.

The Roots of America’s Falling Fertility

Human fertility is not the root of our problems. It is but one symptom of a deeper, more elemental problem.

Men in the Field: The Farming Stories of Leo L. Ward,...

The best stories in the volume offer Cather-esque explorations of the links between place and people. The stories are remarkable for their dense layers, for their social, psychological, and emotional intricacies.