John Cuddeback

John A. Cuddeback is a professor and chairman of the Philosophy Department at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia, where he has taught since 1995. He received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from The Catholic University of America under the direction of F. Russell Hittinger. He has lectured on various topics including virtue, culture, natural law, friendship, and household. His book Friendship: The Art of Happiness was republished in 2010 as True Friendship: Where Virtue Becomes Happiness. His writings have appeared in Nova et Vetera, The Thomist, and The Review of Metaphysics, as well as in several volumes published by the American Maritain Association. Though raised in what he calls an ‘archetypical suburb,’ Columbia, Maryland, he and his wife Sofia consider themselves blessed to be raising their six children in the shadow of the Blue Ridge on the banks of the Shenandoah. At the material center of their homesteading projects are heritage breed pigs, which like the pigs of Eumaeus are fattened on acorns, yielding a bacon that too few people ever enjoy. His website dedicated to the philosophy of family and household is baconfromacorns.com.

The Craft of Education

“Then education is the craft concerned with doing this very thing, this turning around, and with how the soul can most easily and effectively be made to do it.” Plato, Republic VII There is a craft of living a good human life. Plato calls i...

Learning to Wait

“Through delayed fulfillment, good desires grow stronger.” Gregory the Great Almost fifty years ago the famous marshmallow experiment suggested the importance of being able to wait. There are many troubling aspects of the encroa...

My Wife Has What I Need

“Men and women, however, live together not only to procreate children but also to have whatever is needed for life. Indeed, from the beginning, family duties are distinct; some are proper to the husband, others to the wife. Thus mutual need...

Laying Waste Our Fields

“That day when Turnus raised the flag of war… The high commanders… From every quarter drew repeated levies And laid the wide fields waste of their field hands.” Virgil, The Aeneid I have always been alarmed by the ease with which a sand cas...

Asking for Direction in Baffling Times

“All Italians, all the Oenotrian land, Resorted to this place in baffling times, Asking direction; here a priest brought gifts…” Virgil, The Aeneid What do I do now? I often stand in the paradoxical position of knowing tha...

When a Child Leaves Home

“Darling, haven’t you ever heard of a delightful little thing called boarding school?” So Baroness Schraeder responds to Max’s inquiry how she will deal with seven children upon wedding Captain Von Trapp. A few weeks ago I dropped off my so...

One Good Politician

It can be discouraging watching people vie for political power. That they are motivated by a concern for our good is often hard to believe. A man like Aristides is a refreshing reminder: it can be otherwise. There are people that have the m...

Belloc on the New Year

“On New Year’s Eve, at about quarter to twelve o’clock at night, the master of the house and all that are with him go about from room to room opening every door and window, however cold the weather be, for thus, they say, ...

Aristotle on Talking to Yourself

“The virtuous man wishes to converse with himself.” Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, IX Conversations with oneself. They could be a sign that something is wrong. But done well, they are a sign that something is right. A virtuous man, Aristotl...