Kitten and Lettuce

“Of the art of acquisition [of food] then there is one kind which by nature is a part of the management of a household, in so far as the art of household management must either find ready to hand, or itself provide, such things necessary to life…” Aristotle, Politics

Eating is not the most important thing in a household. But it is the indispensable and daily sustenance and context for living a human life. Being intentional about how and what we eat will be determinative of fundamental attitudes in the household, and of our health—bodily and spiritually, individually and communally. Being intentional about eating is within everyone’s reach, and it is our responsibility.

Not everyone is in a position to have a ‘garden.’ But we all can grow something. Or at least try to. For most of us, early August is the last, best opportunity to plant something this year. There are still about sixty days for growing, perhaps fewer for our northern neighbors, and more farther south. But many greens can be ready to eat in forty-five days, radishes in thirty. A small plot of soil, even two feet by two feet, can yield great food, as well as good work, and communal satisfaction. It can also occasion deep insight, and life-changing gratitude.

It is also a real even if small step toward freeing ourselves from over-dependence on an industrial system of food production and distribution. Perhaps this is the only food we will produce. But this step is real and meaningful in itself.

Many hardware stores have seeds on sale at this time of year. Be prepared to water lightly and often while seeds germinate in the hot sun. We will be making a bold step for the renewal of household life, and we might just harvest more than we expect.

Originally posted at Bacon from Acorns

Local Culture
Local Culture
Local Culture
Local Culture
Previous articleFPR Conference. Register Now!
Next articleWhat Ronda Rousey Knows About Caitlyn Jenner
Avatar
John A. Cuddeback is a professor and chairman of the Philosophy Department at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia, where he has taught since 1995. He received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from The Catholic University of America under the direction of F. Russell Hittinger. He has lectured on various topics including virtue, culture, natural law, friendship, and household. His book Friendship: The Art of Happiness was republished in 2010 as True Friendship: Where Virtue Becomes Happiness. His writings have appeared in Nova et Vetera, The Thomist, and The Review of Metaphysics, as well as in several volumes published by the American Maritain Association. Though raised in what he calls an ‘archetypical suburb,’ Columbia, Maryland, he and his wife Sofia consider themselves blessed to be raising their six children in the shadow of the Blue Ridge on the banks of the Shenandoah. At the material center of their homesteading projects are heritage breed pigs, which like the pigs of Eumaeus are fattened on acorns, yielding a bacon that too few people ever enjoy. His website dedicated to the philosophy of family and household is baconfromacorns.com.