For Love of Place: Reflections of an Agrarian Sage.” Allen White interviews Wendell Berry: “I don’t know how to bring about a major transformation of a huge economy, one that is essentially a global economy. I do know how to do certain small things. I could be a decent neighbor to my neighbor, for instance.”

On Being Catholic Modern.” James Matthew Wilson reviews James Chappel’s recent book Catholic Modern and reflects on what it is about the church that makes it truly revolutionary.

Dairy Farming is Dying. After 40 Years, I’m Done.” Jim Goodman explains why he sold his 45 milk cows and how agribusiness operations are driving even organic dairy farms out of business.

The Yellow Rise in Paris.” Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry provides context on the gilets-jaunes protests, arguing they are symptomatic of the failure of French technocrats.

Thomas Merton, the Monk Who Became a Prophet.” Alan Jacobs considers the contradictions that defined Merton’s life and legacy.

What Life is Like Outside the Cloister.” Gregory Hillis reviews How to Live by Judith Valente, a book that discerns how the Rule of St. Benedict might be practiced by those of us who aren’t monks.

Conservative Democracy.” Yoram Hazony proposes an alternative to liberalism, marxism, and fascism.

Russell Kirk and the New Urbanism.” Matthew Robare identifies some of the tenents of New Urbanism in the writing of Russell Kirk. (Recommended by Jeff Polet.)

Conservatism and the Politics of Prudence.” Daniel J. Mahoney draws on Russell Kirk to explain the continued importance of Burke: “Since promethean impatience will always haunt modernity, Burke will remain our indispensable contemporary.”

On John Crowe Ransom’s Newly Discovered Agrarian Classic.” James Matthew Wilson situates Ransom’s recently published Land in its original context and commends its wisdom: “The blessings of a free market only increase when there are some goods that are expressly not for sale.”

Test Runs for the Next Social Contract.” Elias Crim reviews Nathan Schneider’s Everything for Everyone, concluding: “If you’re looking for signs of hope amidst the neoliberal wreckage, this brilliant account of post-capitalist cooperative economics is the place to start.”

The Best Books I Read in 2018.” Gracy Olmstead’s reading list contains many gems.