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Free Speech as a “A Delicately Manicured Garden”: A Review of...

Michael Knowles: “Free speech cannot be an open plain; nor can it be a jungle; it must be a delicately manicured garden."

Not Hasty Enough: The God of the Garden by Andrew Peterson

“Growing things are good” isn’t a sufficiently coherent claim for a book. While the questions and problems that Andrew Peterson raises in The God of the Garden are thorny and complex, his ideas deserve greater development.

Flying Solo: A Spiritual-But-Not-Religious Biography of an American Icon

Gehrz traces the life of a fascinating individual, but in the process he raises important moral questions about which story of transcendence we seek to pursue.

The Grace of Belonging: A Review of You are Not...

Emily Wenneborg reviews You are Not Your Own, by Alan Noble. Noble confronts the lie of autonomy that shapes Western society and counsels radical dependence on God’s grace.

Faith The Size of a Mustard Seed: A Review of Katy...

As Earth Without Water got me thinking about the mystery of seeds, the mystery of faith, and the mystery of Divine action in the world. The novel is not about farmers, or even about the literal planting of seeds. Instead, it is about two painters and sometimes lovers and the germination of their faith and submission to God’s will.

What Has Postliberalism to do with Jerusalem? A Review of ...

Henry George reviews A World After Liberalism, by Matthew Rose.

Taking (Democratic) Control of One’s Own Traffic

Wichita, KS. That Charles Marohn is a friend to localist movements across the United States and beyond is indisputable. It’s not just that he...

Lonely in the Center

Hassler and McDonagh conclude their stories with the hope that, in the absence of the clergy, faithful everyday Christians can rebuild the lost soil of local culture through faith and forgiveness.

We the Corporations: A Review

Corporate rights was not a spontaneous development but the result of a sort of corporate civil-rights movement. Through litigation (generally well-financed) over two centuries, various corporations won decisions by which corporations evolved from government-created artificial persons, not even mentioned by name in the Constitution, into entities possessed of many of the same constitutional rights as flesh-and-blood human beings.

Review: The Soul of The American University Revisited

As our society considers higher education in the twenty-first century, the best way to decide what universities should be is not to gaze into the future, but to study the past for what universities have been and what they have been able to do. Marsden’s thoughtful and thorough historical narrative in The Soul of the American University Revisited raises a helpful signpost for our society.