Matt Stewart

19 POSTS6 COMMENTS
Matt Stewart is a teacher at The Ambrose School in Meridian, Idaho. He holds a PhD in history from Syracuse University and has published essays and reviews with Boom California, Fides et Historia, and High Country News. He is the author of Most Beautiful Place on Earth: Wallace Stegner in California.

Recent Essays

Focus on the Local: A Conversation with Carl Trueman

Though his recent bestselling books trace the roots of several deeply entrenched beliefs about human nature and our world that have led us into bewildering territory, Trueman concludes both books with a look back into the ancient church and a call to faithful Christian work in local churches.

Jessica Hooten Wilson, Doug Sikkema, and Christine Norvell on Rescuing Socrates

One gets the clear sense from Montás that these voices from the past are not just texts with trivial information, but real presences, real friends who have had a significant role in shaping, forming Montás’ life. And if any core program is going to work, it needs men and women like Montás who are the living, breathing embodiment of a life made richer by true fellowship with this great “democracy of the dead,” to borrow Chesterton’s phrase.

Epistemology on the Front Porch: Esther Lightcap Meek

Esther Lightcap Meek on Wendell Berry, Michael Polanyi, and covenant epistemology.

Ordered for Fruitfulness: An Interview with Michael LeFebvre

In the context of the calendars for holidays, feasts, and Sabbath observance in Leviticus, LeFebvre argues that we need to attend to the creation account in Genesis as a calendar for shaping the sacred rhythm of labor and worship.

Grace Olmstead on Uprooted, Place, Idaho, and Prairie Lupines

Fidelity to place needn’t (and shouldn’t) result in stuckness, a condemnation of ever moving at all. But we must beware falling into that second trap: rejecting roots altogether.

Brass Spittoon: Bradley Birzer on Christian Humanism

Bradley Birzer on Christian humanism, judging the past, memory, and gratitude.

Brass Spittoon: Ken Myers on Three Decades (almost) of Mars Hill Audio

Ken Myers of Mars Hill Audio on place, the evangelical mind, and classical music.

Brass Spittoon: Wall Street vs. Main Street, 2020

Chris Arnade, Jared Woodard, and Sarah Hamersma on Wall Street versus Main Street.

Brass Spittoon: Conservatism, Inc.

Patrick Deneen, Jeremy Beer, and Jeff Polet respond to J.D. Vance's recent American Mind essay "End the Globalization Gravy Train" and consider the prospects for postliberal conservatism.

Brass Spittoon: Digital Fatigue and Pastoral Care During a Pandemic

Jay Y. Kim reflects on pastoral care during the pandemic in light of his recent book Analog Church: Why We Need Real People, Places, and Things in the Digital Age.

Brass Spittoon: Classical Education

While the siren call of STEM is still music to most ears and classical schools are educating only a small percentage of American students, classical schools have grown steadily. Joshua Gibbs, Adam Roate, and Amanda Patchin discuss their merits.

Call Me Lucifer

Alexa is no doubt low-hanging fruit for the readers of Front Porch Republic. It is a place-contaminating, unlimited tyrant. If you've purchased one, watch out. When the lights start pulsing and your smart speaker starts shrieking, it will be too late. The peloton of drone-wraiths will be only seconds away.