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Philosophers & Saints

Epistemology on the Front Porch: Esther Lightcap Meek

Esther Lightcap Meek on Wendell Berry, Michael Polanyi, and covenant epistemology.

Collectivism and Violence are One

The left is collectivizing, the right falling apart. Can a pragmatic, humanist center hold?

“I can not live in this world”: A Review of Paul...

One answer from Kingsnorth’s fiction lies in limits. No human, nor all of us put together, is sovereign over the fate of the world, despite the unprecedented power we enjoy over life and death within it.

Christian Platonism and the Eternal Good

Christian Platonism’s affirmation that we are spiritual beings who will outlive this current life, in one manner or another, lends us powerful impetus to reconsider what it means to spend life here and now in a worthwhile fashion.

The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: A Review

The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self draws on a deep reservoir of erudition rather than the shallow puddle of populism.

Reading Petrarch’s Secretum with College Sophomores

When Petrarch uses Augustine to call himself out for being bound and dragged down by the “chains of love and glory,” students are forced to consider what it is they are pursuing, in college and in life.

The Art of Living an Examined Life

If human beings flourish from their inner core rather than in the realm of impact and results, then the inner work of learning is fundamental to human happiness, as far from pointless wheel spinning as are the forms of tenderness we owe our children or grandchildren.

Awakening to Virtue: Confessions of a Well-Read, Unlucky Good Girl

Both Prior and Gibbs agree that ultimately virtue orients us toward one end, to “love God and enjoy Him forever.” Loving God is difficult; it too requires our attention in a culture that is constantly distracting us. And while virtue brings about human flourishing that can be observed from the outside, loving God requires us to remember who we are on the inside. It is the place where we are to be good alone … in the presence of One.

Brass Spittoon: Bradley Birzer on Christian Humanism

Bradley Birzer on Christian humanism, judging the past, memory, and gratitude.

Protestants and Western Civ.

Hillsdale, Michigan. Which is more surprising? To read that a Great Booksy curriculum—which you, a fairly committed Protestant who tries to keep faith under...