Alex Sosler

Alex Sosler
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Alex Sosler is Assistant Professor of Bible and Ministry at Montreat College and assisting priest at Redeemer Anglican Church. He’s currently writing a book on the Christian Liberal Arts to be published with Falls City Press.

Recent Essays

The Liberal Arts for Loss and Lament

The main posture of a liberal arts education is slowing down, rest, seeing. But if we just train students to only strive, reach, stretch for something more, then suffering will come as a wasteful, meaningless interruption.

Ted Lasso as Parish Priest

Ted Lasso offers a compelling model of a good parish priest: this fictional football coach exemplifies how to lead others with care.

Sacred Reality: The Augustinian Vision of Goodness in Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead

Robinson presents us with an encounter: a participatory, embodied experience; a blessed and broken reality; the sacraments. And from this encounter, we receive courageous eyes to see the precious things that have been placed in our hands and to honor them accordingly.

The Instrumentalization of the Liberal Arts

The liberal arts aren’t for some utilitarian purpose; they’re to free young people to love rightly.

Failing in a Pandemic

The whole mode of online education screams that now I must be the source of attraction. But I’m not entertaining. In fact, I’m pretty unentertaining. If you ask most of my students, they may even say I’m boring.

The Classroom as a Welcoming Space

If we have all the knowledge in the world but have not love, the apostle Paul says, then we’re as annoying as a banging cymbal. It’s no wonder students wouldn’t want to listen to us.

Waiting, Seeing, and Receiving

Advent is a reminder that God has not forgotten—that He is faithful to His promises, that we're not left to our own devices, that he hears and knows.

The Temptation of Minimalism and Excess: A Simple Home in an Abundant World

In the discussion of minimalism, I want to suggest it’s less about what’s in your home than what your home is used for. It’s not what you don’t have in your home, but the people you do. It’s not the values you say you believe, but your disposition towards your neighbor and to things.