Casey Spinks

Casey Spinks
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Casey Spinks is a doctoral student in the religion department at Baylor University. A native of Baton Rouge, he earned his B.A. and M.A. in philosophy and religious studies at Louisiana State University. His academic work has appeared in the book Taking Kierkegaard Personally and the journals International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy & Theology and Perspectives in Religious Studies. And he has written essays for The Imaginative Conservative, Christianity Today, and VoegelinView. He is also an avid birder and occasional carpenter.

Recent Essays

Watching Movies and Wondering about Metaphysics in an Anxious Age

Casey Spinks muses on zombie shows, Pixar movies, Scorsese films, metaphysical realism, and the philosophical fate of modern culture in his review of Age of Anxiety: Meaning, Identity, and Politics in 21st-Century Film and Literature, by Anthony Wachs and Jon Schaff.

Take to the Land: A Strategy for Third Parties

Even if ‘land’ is less important than actual vote share, this map does point to a very real issue at the heart of American politics: namely that majorities, specifically local majorities, matter very much in our democracy.

The Promise and Forgiveness of Hillbilly Elegy

Hillbilly Elegy is indeed political, but in a deeper sense, entangled as it is in the webs of broken promises and repeated forgiveness.

Notes on a Mad Hunter’s Morality

The act of hunting makes hunters guilty—and so it makes them moral.

Weird Christianity’s Aesthetic and the Tyranny of Values

So long as old Christianity is treated as an aesthetic or an alternative lifestyle or a set of values contending against alienated modernity, it will never be anything more than a therapeutic commodity. But if we allow it to reckon with us, we may find ourselves snared in the grasp of “something real.”

The Knight of Faith: Franz Jägerstätter’s Hidden Life

In the midst of whatever trials come to us and whatever revelations do not, we are still called to serve, to do good, and to love our neighbors as ourselves. And to believe in the voice that may not choose to speak to us, to hold fast to the goodness given to our beloved but unseen by everyone else—that is the vocation of faith for many of us.

Hannah Arendt on Labor, Work, and Dwelling—and Plastic Straws

An appreciation for labor and the cycle of nature is not itself enough for sustainable human dwelling. We also need a re-appreciation of the durability and independence of the works we produce.

Why Heidegger Stayed in the Provinces—and Why it is Not Time for the ‘Robert Penn Warren Option’

In 1934, the philosopher Martin Heidegger, tired of his ill-inclined maneuvering to become the celebrity intellectual who would steer the Nazi Party into greatness,...

The Local Bonhoeffer

Dietrich Bonhoeffer stands at the fore of figures of the Christian past who loom large over political theology and religious activism today. The German...

A Tale of Two Tragedies

This past week, the Baton Rouge district attorney announced he would not press charges against the two police officers who shot and killed Alton...

Captioning Over our Grief

In the spirit of Oscar season, we do well to look back at what the 2017 ‘Academy’ ignored. One such film is this fall’s...