The Nightstand

Taking (Democratic) Control of One’s Own Traffic

Wichita, KS. That Charles Marohn is a friend to localist movements across the United States and beyond is indisputable. It’s not just that he...

What Has Postliberalism to do with Jerusalem? A Review of ...

Henry George reviews A World After Liberalism, by Matthew Rose.

The Grace of Belonging: A Review of You are Not...

Emily Wenneborg reviews You are Not Your Own, by Alan Noble. Noble confronts the lie of autonomy that shapes Western society and counsels radical dependence on God’s grace.

Faith The Size of a Mustard Seed: A Review of Katy...

As Earth Without Water got me thinking about the mystery of seeds, the mystery of faith, and the mystery of Divine action in the world. The novel is not about farmers, or even about the literal planting of seeds. Instead, it is about two painters and sometimes lovers and the germination of their faith and submission to God’s will.

Free Speech as a “A Delicately Manicured Garden”: A Review of...

Michael Knowles: “Free speech cannot be an open plain; nor can it be a jungle; it must be a delicately manicured garden."

Flying Solo: A Spiritual-But-Not-Religious Biography of an American Icon

Gehrz traces the life of a fascinating individual, but in the process he raises important moral questions about which story of transcendence we seek to pursue.

Not Hasty Enough: The God of the Garden by Andrew Peterson

“Growing things are good” isn’t a sufficiently coherent claim for a book. While the questions and problems that Andrew Peterson raises in The God of the Garden are thorny and complex, his ideas deserve greater development.