Tag: books

The Insistent Cough of Grace: Remembering Frederick Buechner

His books are not a diminishment of historic and intellectual Christianity. They are a translation of Aquinas, Barth, Calvin, and the rest into the language we all speak innately but are all too often deaf to: the language of our quotidian lives, in which the undifferentiated mass of uncertain “certain things” forms the alphabet of grace.

Every Town has a Story Worth Saving: A Review of Hello,...

Establishments like The Bookstore, when at their best, are not exclusively or perhaps even primarily in the business of providing people with printed texts. They are places in which proprietors like Tannenbaum foster community in the context of a shared love of the written word. When the need to physically isolate undermines the ability of such places to foster this community, they are at risk of becoming less essential to their patrons.

Pretend It’s a Book

Fran Liebowitz suggests that “a book isn’t supposed to be a mirror, it’s supposed to be a door.” Universities are the same. They are not meant to simply reflect the times and trends. They are intended to open doors to existing knowledge and doors to a reimagined future.

Should We Read the Words of the Unsavory Dead?

Alan Jacobs is right that if we would receive a blessing from the dead, we will have to wrestle with them.

Reading Reality (and Watching for Bric-à-Brac on Our Windowsill)

Christian monastic pioneers saw that books left on the windowsill are more likely to make an impression on those outside than on those within.

The Pleasures of a Liturgical Calendar of Reading

The day after Thanksgiving yields a joy of three parts. The first joy is that of an introvert newly restored to peace and quiet...

The American Bookstore: A List

Go here to read the first part of this two-part essay on the American Bookstore. Several hours before a home game at the University of Michigan, the owner of a bookstore on...

The Learning and Limits of Libraries

Three articles recently caught my eye, all of which having to do with scholars' fame, only two having to do with their libraries. The bookless...

Books and the Hungry Soul

Beautifully and substantially-made books suggest something that deserve to be pored over at length, just as one lingers with friends after a wonderful meal.

Nicholas Carr’s Shallows, and the Death of the Book

I just completed Nicholas Carr's excellent book, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, and--because that's the sort of person I...