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Finding Joy in Intentional Community

Intentional community stands as a powerful rebuke to the modern pursuit of the good life: it is not by restlessly seeking to improve our circumstances, but by committing ourselves to a place and people, that joy becomes possible.

Weird Christianity’s Aesthetic and the Tyranny of Values

So long as old Christianity is treated as an aesthetic or an alternative lifestyle or a set of values contending against alienated modernity, it will never be anything more than a therapeutic commodity. But if we allow it to reckon with us, we may find ourselves snared in the grasp of “something real.”

The Consumer: Time to Wake the Sleeping Giant

In my first essay here at Front Porch Republic, I wrote about the idea that creation-friendly agriculture is not about going back...

Justice, Sovereignty, and the Throwaway Culture: Reading Charles Camosy

We live in a time of political disruption. In the United States and around the developed world we are seeing nationalist and...

The Promise of the Green New Deal

For all its current weaknesses, the GND is an effort to “solve for pattern” as Wendell Berry recommends.

Nonsense on Stilts? Dandyism? Okay.

If I were God, I’d keep other company.

The Banks we Deserve, the Economy we can Sustain

If you didn't catch this panel put on by Marketplace and BBC, it's pretty exciting. It takes the expert panel only about 10 minutes (2:00...

New Symposium on Distributism

Porch readers will be interested in the new online symposium on distributism that is now on ANAMNESIS, A Journal for the Study of Tradition,...

Thoughts on the British Riots

They do not smash shop windows to get their hands on plasma televisions, because their parents' wealth makes such toys readily available to them, but they really have no greater desire in life than to have a plasma television

Bruce Springsteen’s The Rising: Ten Years Down the Road

Springsteen’s music does indeed return to the things that are most important in an hour of crisis. But contrary to popular impressions, these things turn out to have very little to do with politics. They have everything to do with the humane values of tradition: love of family, friends, neighbors, and place.